If you’re going to use native ads in your publications, it’s very important that you know what you’re getting into and you stay true to the ideas, morals and values that you want to project for your brand. The first thing to understand is the different types of native ads that you can use.

Within Feeds

Usually these ads appear on networks right in the information feed for users, with a label of “sponsored” on it. You can see a lot of these types of ads on Facebook, for example.

Paid Search

This is seen on Google where the paid results appear at the top or right side of the search results, but look a lot like the other results.

Recommended Widgets

You’ll see these on the right or at the bottom or side of other editorial content on CNN if you look. They are often pushed by a platform like Outbrain.com.

Promoted Listings

These are used on platforms like Amazon or YouTube. They usually appear to the right side of other listings that are similar, and state that they are promoted or sponsored.

In-Ad Units

These often appear near content and take users away from the page they are reading. They are considered relevant content.


This might appear on iTunes, YouTube or other accounts that list sponsored content for very specific types of ads.

Create a Sponsorship Page

If you want to sell native ads, you’ll need to create a page that lets people know you want to accept sponsorships. You can create the page that allows you to control the user experience and ensure that any ad you accept meets your standards. You’ll want to list a publication calendar so that the businesses know what is coming up. This means that they will know what events, ideas, products, and content is relevant for your audience.

Practice Transparency

Ensure that your users know that you accept these types of ads and label them appropriately each time they’re included in your users’ experiences. Whether it’s a giveaway on YouTube, or a product haul, or mentioning specific ingredients for a recipe, let your users know that you’re being paid for that – or else they will grow not to trust you.

Say No

Sometimes you’ll get an offer that just doesn’t fit your ideals. It’s okay to say no. Money isn’t everything. For example, if you’ve tried a product and you don’t like it, it’s okay to tell the company that you’ve tried it and you don’t like it. They want to know the truth and will appreciate that. If a company sends you a free product unsolicited, it’s okay to show your audience and give it a bad review even when you got the product free. Say so in the review and be fair.

The important thing is to be sure that the product fits your ideas, morals, and goals for your business. If not, skip it. There is nothing wrong with making money doing what you love, and even for promoting products you will use anyway. But, don’t get carried away with the money and take on promoting things you don’t like and will never use.

Tips for Incorporating Native Advertising into Your Publications
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