Cloud computing is a 160 billion dollar industry. It’s fabulous for small businesses, because now they can compete with big business even if they don’t have the infrastructure to build intranets and all the other things they had to do before cloud computing existed. For example, a sole proprietor graphic designer can now use Creative Suite by Adobe in the cloud for a monthly fee instead of a high up-front cost with yearly updates.

But, even with all these advantages there are still concerns about the safety of cloud computing. After all, your information is now in cyberspace where in theory anyone can get hold of it.

Nothing Is a Sure Thing

It’s true that no one can say that cloud computing is 100 percent safe. 100 percent anything just doesn’t exist, especially safety. You know that your home computer or office computer can be broken into, but so can the cloud. However, it pays for cloud-based businesses to try to prevent as many problems as possible and it’s something they’re always working on. You don’t need to invest at all to get the highest safety they can muster.

In-House Data Centers versus Someone Else

When you use cloud-based systems, you’re relying on someone who is not in house to watch over your data. But, you’re likely saving thousands of dollars when you consider the salary you’d have to pay your personal IT department. Most small businesses simply can’t afford to start that way, and many large businesses are not working that way any longer due to cloud computing.
Does the cost of in-house systems really make up for the potential added security and is it really safer? Break-ins happen with in-house systems as they do with cloud systems, so likely it balances out.

Cyberattacks Happen

It’s probably happened to your website, and it can happen to your cloud computing systems too. Cloud-based software companies are going to be proactive in trying to prevent attacks and fixing problems once the attack happens, but it can still happen. Anytime you have data online, a cyberattack can happen from people who want your data. But, it can happen in house too. No place is truly 100 percent safe, but you need to check out the businesses you want to work with and pick the one with the best record.

Pick Better Stronger Passwords

In all honesty, when there are breaches it’s because some people pick horrible passwords. A recent NSA security breach showed that the most common passwords are “password” and “123456”. This shows that people are kind of ignorant of how important that password is. Systems should force the use of harder passwords and force users to change them often to be more secure. If you yourself pick better passwords, change them every 90 days or so, and always back up, you’ll keep yourself safer even when you do use cloud computing.

Nothing Is Standardized

One problem with cloud computing that still needs to be resolved is the lack of standards across the board. For example, the technology exists for two-step verification, as well as bio verification and forcing harder passwords, but most companies don’t do it because they fear turning off prospective buyers. If consumers started demanding more security, even if they don’t fully understand it, it would be harder for criminals to steal information from the cloud or your intranet.

It’s Getting Safer

At a recent RSA Conference, Google Director of Security stated (see link below) that the cloud is getting safer and is finally safe enough to use. Because in all reality, all that it means to use the “cloud” is that you’re renting space on someone else’s server. All you have to do is be more cognizant of which servers you’re using, and who you’re renting the space from to have more security.

Link to article – click here

So, in answer to the question: “Is cloud computing safe?” the answer is really that nothing is 100 percent safe, even using your own data centers. Because things happen: fires, electricity surges, servers burning up, hackers hacking and so forth – and always will happen. So, whether you use your own servers or someone else’s, there are risk of losing data to damage or thieves. All you can do is try to be as secure as possible, and pay attention to new trends when it comes to data security in the cloud.

Cloud Computing – Is It Safe?
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